HOLY WEEK CRAFT KIT: Holy Thursday

This tutorial page is part of the HOLY WEEK CRAFT KIT created by Orthodox Pebbles.

THANK YOU for purchasing the Orthodox Pebbles Holy Week Craft Kit! We are very excited to be doing this Christ-centered creative journey together with you. Please scroll down for some background on today’s theme and for a tutorial on how to do today’s craft.


At church, on Holy Thursday evening, the Orthros (Matins) service usually takes place in anticipation of the following day. So the theme mentioned on Holy Thursday evening is actually the one relevant to Holy Friday, and it is the Holy Passion of Christ.

The following day, Holy Friday, is a day of mourning: Christ is taken down from the Cross and placed inside the Tomb. Some of the readings of Holy Thursday are repeated on Holy Friday, together with additional ones.

Today’s craft is focusing on the commemorated events of both days, whereas Holy Friday’s craft is relevant to the Epitaphios tradition.

Bible reading
On Holy Thursday evening, the “Twelve Gospels” are read, detailing the Holy Passion.

The parts about the Crucifixion are:
Mark 15: 21-32
Matthew 27: 35-54
Luke 23:32-49

The parts about the Burial are:
John 19: 25-37
Mark 15: 43-47
John 19: 38-42
Matthew 27: 62-66

The printed illustration provided in the kit is based on the icon of the Extreme Humility, which depicts the crucified dead body of Christ upright in the Tomb and the Holy Cross in the background. This icon combines many events – the Crucifixion, the Lamentations, and the Burial. The sign above Christ’s head reads: “The King of Glory” (Ο Βασιλεύς της Δόξης). We see this icon inside the Altar, on the Prothesis table.

Icon by unknown artist, 15th century, Icon Museum Recklinghausen [Public domain] via Wikimedia Commons.


THE HOLY PASSION
Flower-framed icon-inspired scene

PHOTO OF FINISHED CRAFT HERE

You will need:

  • The printed Crucifixion scene provided in the kit
  • The tissue paper provided in the kit
  • A large piece of poster board or cardboard (a leftover cardboard box piece works fine)
  • A pair of scissors
  • Scotch tape
  • Glue

How to make the flowers

Make the flower petal circles

Start with a full sheet of tissue paper. You can stack a few sheets of tissue paper together to make more flowers at the same time. First fold the paper in half. Then fold in half again.

Fold the bottom corner up diagonally to make a triangle. Depending on the original size of your paper, there may or may not be a rectangle protruding at the top edge of the triangle. If there is a rectangle, cut it off so that only the triangle remains.

Fold the triangle in half to make a smaller triangle. Fold in half one more time.

Hold the triangle from the corner and cut off a scalloped design on the free edge.

Unfold the triangle, and your flower petal circles are ready.

Make the leaves

Start with the full sheet of green tissue paper. You can stack both sheets together to make more leaves at the same time. Fold the paper a few times. Hold the folded paper firmly and cut out the leaves all at once.

Assemble the flowers

Take one or two flower petal circles. Loosely fold in half, then in half again.

Place one or two leaves between the flower petals.

Twist and crimp the paper at the corner to hold everything in place. Open up the petals pressing down at the center with your fingers and your flower is ready!

How to complete the craft

The size of the poster board or cardboard has to be larger than the icon, so when the icon is placed on it, there is a generous frame all around. Glue the Crucifixion scene on the poster board or cardboard. Then tape the flowers on the frame. Ready!


FREE ADDITIONAL MATERIAL

We have also created a Holy Week planner, extra activities and a lesson plan for Holy Thursday that we are offering on our website for free.

ADDITIONAL TEACHING RESOURCE
Pascha fabric learning set

In addition to the above material, we have created a hands-on teaching resource made out of soft fleece fabric that is used like a felt board to help explore fundamental Pascha concepts and traditions.


BACKGROUND